How to build your brand on TikTok

Just over a year ago, TikTok was almost banned in the US.

Today, brands are switching their ad spend from Meta to TikTok (RIP Meta stock down 20%).

How and where people consume media is changing rapidly.

But before we go and drop a ton of money on ads on TikTok because someone on Twitter said they are printing money, let's approach your content from a brand's perspective.

What about organically posting on TikTok?

Most brands haven't been on TikTok because they are struggling with creating videos.

Video is a lot harder than photos, so the barrier to entry is not the same as Instagram or Facebook.

Don't worry, no dancing is needed to build a following on TikTok if you follow my approach to thinking about content creation for TikTok.

1.  Who do you want to attract?

Impressions might make you feel good, but not all impressions lead to revenue.

Think about your ideal customer and figure out their interests.

Once you know your customer's interests, start to look at content that is already being created on the platform.

What would your typical customer be watching on TikTok?

Who would your typical customer follow on TikTok?

Once you start watching the content your ideal customer watches, you will begin to get a good idea of how you should communicate to them on TikTok.

You might see how you talk to your customers on TikTok is different than other platforms, so just know that in advance.

2. Play to your strengths

My leadership coach, Chris McAlister, taught me to not chase hype and to think about my identity as a person long-term.

I believe many brands need to think long-term when it comes to content.

If you do what is trending only but don't do what is true to your brand, you are at the whims of trends versus building a brand that transcends any trend.

To build a brand that lasts, you need to play to your strengths.

Not everyone has to dance on TikTok or tell funny jokes.

As you create content, go back to your customer persona and ask, is this a video that my customer would watch on TikTok?

It will take time to figure out what works for your brand and audience.

3. Test concepts and ideas

Most videos won't work but that is okay.

I think that people online love talking about virality on the platform which has created an expectation that a video should be viral or it is a bust.

But that just isn't the case.

And if you are thinking about brand strength, long-term, consistent posting is better than trying to go viral and giving up.

What might work for one brand might not work for yours, so don't compare.

Focus on your customer.

Keep trying concepts and videos until you find what works.

Then stay consistent creating videos.

4. Commit to the long-term

If you want to build a brand, you need to be in it for the long haul.

This is also true for TikTok content creation.

Figuring out this platform is not easy.

You need to invest time, money, and resources in creating content.

Success on TikTok is not as easy as the headlines suggest.

How to build your brand on TikTok

Just over a year ago, TikTok was almost banned in the US.

Today, brands are switching their ad spend from Meta to TikTok (RIP Meta stock down 20%).

How and where people consume media is changing rapidly.

But before we go and drop a ton of money on ads on TikTok because someone on Twitter said they are printing money, let's approach your content from a brand's perspective.

What about organically posting on TikTok?

Most brands haven't been on TikTok because they are struggling with creating videos.

Video is a lot harder than photos, so the barrier to entry is not the same as Instagram or Facebook.

Don't worry, no dancing is needed to build a following on TikTok if you follow my approach to thinking about content creation for TikTok.

1.  Who do you want to attract?

Impressions might make you feel good, but not all impressions lead to revenue.

Think about your ideal customer and figure out their interests.

Once you know your customer's interests, start to look at content that is already being created on the platform.

What would your typical customer be watching on TikTok?

Who would your typical customer follow on TikTok?

Once you start watching the content your ideal customer watches, you will begin to get a good idea of how you should communicate to them on TikTok.

You might see how you talk to your customers on TikTok is different than other platforms, so just know that in advance.

2. Play to your strengths

My leadership coach, Chris McAlister, taught me to not chase hype and to think about my identity as a person long-term.

I believe many brands need to think long-term when it comes to content.

If you do what is trending only but don't do what is true to your brand, you are at the whims of trends versus building a brand that transcends any trend.

To build a brand that lasts, you need to play to your strengths.

Not everyone has to dance on TikTok or tell funny jokes.

As you create content, go back to your customer persona and ask, is this a video that my customer would watch on TikTok?

It will take time to figure out what works for your brand and audience.

3. Test concepts and ideas

Most videos won't work but that is okay.

I think that people online love talking about virality on the platform which has created an expectation that a video should be viral or it is a bust.

But that just isn't the case.

And if you are thinking about brand strength, long-term, consistent posting is better than trying to go viral and giving up.

What might work for one brand might not work for yours, so don't compare.

Focus on your customer.

Keep trying concepts and videos until you find what works.

Then stay consistent creating videos.

4. Commit to the long-term

If you want to build a brand, you need to be in it for the long haul.

This is also true for TikTok content creation.

Figuring out this platform is not easy.

You need to invest time, money, and resources in creating content.

Success on TikTok is not as easy as the headlines suggest.

How to build your brand on TikTok

Just over a year ago, TikTok was almost banned in the US.

Today, brands are switching their ad spend from Meta to TikTok (RIP Meta stock down 20%).

How and where people consume media is changing rapidly.

But before we go and drop a ton of money on ads on TikTok because someone on Twitter said they are printing money, let's approach your content from a brand's perspective.

What about organically posting on TikTok?

Most brands haven't been on TikTok because they are struggling with creating videos.

Video is a lot harder than photos, so the barrier to entry is not the same as Instagram or Facebook.

Don't worry, no dancing is needed to build a following on TikTok if you follow my approach to thinking about content creation for TikTok.

1.  Who do you want to attract?

Impressions might make you feel good, but not all impressions lead to revenue.

Think about your ideal customer and figure out their interests.

Once you know your customer's interests, start to look at content that is already being created on the platform.

What would your typical customer be watching on TikTok?

Who would your typical customer follow on TikTok?

Once you start watching the content your ideal customer watches, you will begin to get a good idea of how you should communicate to them on TikTok.

You might see how you talk to your customers on TikTok is different than other platforms, so just know that in advance.

2. Play to your strengths

My leadership coach, Chris McAlister, taught me to not chase hype and to think about my identity as a person long-term.

I believe many brands need to think long-term when it comes to content.

If you do what is trending only but don't do what is true to your brand, you are at the whims of trends versus building a brand that transcends any trend.

To build a brand that lasts, you need to play to your strengths.

Not everyone has to dance on TikTok or tell funny jokes.

As you create content, go back to your customer persona and ask, is this a video that my customer would watch on TikTok?

It will take time to figure out what works for your brand and audience.

3. Test concepts and ideas

Most videos won't work but that is okay.

I think that people online love talking about virality on the platform which has created an expectation that a video should be viral or it is a bust.

But that just isn't the case.

And if you are thinking about brand strength, long-term, consistent posting is better than trying to go viral and giving up.

What might work for one brand might not work for yours, so don't compare.

Focus on your customer.

Keep trying concepts and videos until you find what works.

Then stay consistent creating videos.

4. Commit to the long-term

If you want to build a brand, you need to be in it for the long haul.

This is also true for TikTok content creation.

Figuring out this platform is not easy.

You need to invest time, money, and resources in creating content.

Success on TikTok is not as easy as the headlines suggest.