One Practical Step To Understand Customer Psychology

I am keeping this newsletter short because I have been chilling with the wisdom teeth operation and recovery.

Today I want to amplify a process we are starting to add to our ad creation service.

Before adding this new step, during our onboarding call with a client, we would ask them why customers buy their products.

We took those answers to help craft hooks and information on the ads.

The downside is that there could be other factors that people buy from you as a brand.

Yes, you might be solving problems, but there could be other reasons you don't know outside of your three product values.

So we would create ads based on what the brand was saying versus the actual customers.

I wanted to make sure my team understood customer psychology so we could make better ads for clients.

The main question is, how do we find out this information?

The comment section.

The comment section can be rude, but also extremely helpful.

People don't think; they just type.

You get a raw response from a customer versus a review where the customer refines their experience into what the brand might want to hear.

Sarah Levinger is a good friend who has been preaching about customer psychology for ads.

She taught me to look away from the reviews and focus on the comment section.

Sarah takes the comments into a spreadsheet and starts to find trends.

Are there similar words being said?

Are people buying this as a gift for someone?

Are there similar problems or settings being talked about?

When you start to see new trends, you can craft new hooks or even types of people in your ads.

Let's say people keep talking about a family member in the comments; Maybe create videos with families versus just one person.

Or you could change up the words and script to mention family.

The comment section is a goldmine for customer insight and can you better understand the customer's psychology.

We started implementing this extra step when we onboarded a client to help us figure out what we might want to test for new ads.

One Practical Step To Understand Customer Psychology

I am keeping this newsletter short because I have been chilling with the wisdom teeth operation and recovery.

Today I want to amplify a process we are starting to add to our ad creation service.

Before adding this new step, during our onboarding call with a client, we would ask them why customers buy their products.

We took those answers to help craft hooks and information on the ads.

The downside is that there could be other factors that people buy from you as a brand.

Yes, you might be solving problems, but there could be other reasons you don't know outside of your three product values.

So we would create ads based on what the brand was saying versus the actual customers.

I wanted to make sure my team understood customer psychology so we could make better ads for clients.

The main question is, how do we find out this information?

The comment section.

The comment section can be rude, but also extremely helpful.

People don't think; they just type.

You get a raw response from a customer versus a review where the customer refines their experience into what the brand might want to hear.

Sarah Levinger is a good friend who has been preaching about customer psychology for ads.

She taught me to look away from the reviews and focus on the comment section.

Sarah takes the comments into a spreadsheet and starts to find trends.

Are there similar words being said?

Are people buying this as a gift for someone?

Are there similar problems or settings being talked about?

When you start to see new trends, you can craft new hooks or even types of people in your ads.

Let's say people keep talking about a family member in the comments; Maybe create videos with families versus just one person.

Or you could change up the words and script to mention family.

The comment section is a goldmine for customer insight and can you better understand the customer's psychology.

We started implementing this extra step when we onboarded a client to help us figure out what we might want to test for new ads.

One Practical Step To Understand Customer Psychology

I am keeping this newsletter short because I have been chilling with the wisdom teeth operation and recovery.

Today I want to amplify a process we are starting to add to our ad creation service.

Before adding this new step, during our onboarding call with a client, we would ask them why customers buy their products.

We took those answers to help craft hooks and information on the ads.

The downside is that there could be other factors that people buy from you as a brand.

Yes, you might be solving problems, but there could be other reasons you don't know outside of your three product values.

So we would create ads based on what the brand was saying versus the actual customers.

I wanted to make sure my team understood customer psychology so we could make better ads for clients.

The main question is, how do we find out this information?

The comment section.

The comment section can be rude, but also extremely helpful.

People don't think; they just type.

You get a raw response from a customer versus a review where the customer refines their experience into what the brand might want to hear.

Sarah Levinger is a good friend who has been preaching about customer psychology for ads.

She taught me to look away from the reviews and focus on the comment section.

Sarah takes the comments into a spreadsheet and starts to find trends.

Are there similar words being said?

Are people buying this as a gift for someone?

Are there similar problems or settings being talked about?

When you start to see new trends, you can craft new hooks or even types of people in your ads.

Let's say people keep talking about a family member in the comments; Maybe create videos with families versus just one person.

Or you could change up the words and script to mention family.

The comment section is a goldmine for customer insight and can you better understand the customer's psychology.

We started implementing this extra step when we onboarded a client to help us figure out what we might want to test for new ads.