How to get high-end photos and videos that work

UGC and TikTok have completely taken over the conversation regarding producing content.

But in the shadows is high-end production of photos and videos.

I was just interviewed by Eric Bandholz about high-end photos and videos, and I wanted to go deeper here on the newsletter.

I am not saying people trash on photos and videos, but I think the conversation has shifted to "ugly" content is better than "pretty."

The issue was never what the ad or content was shot on, phone vs. cinema camera.

The issue has/is that high-end production doesn't understand conversion and e-commerce marketing.

But if you have a creative team that understands e-commerce marketing and production, that is a match made in heaven (cough cough, Goodo Studios).

Today, I will talk about what to expect to get great production created for you.

1. Why invest in nice photos and videos

The phone has democratized creation, but that doesn't mean that everyone is good at creating.

Creating photos and videos is still an art form.

A phone camera is great for quick shots, and the quality is great for that.

But if you are trying to build a brand story and a unique visual brand, which you should all want to do if you want to stand out, then you need maximum control.

Having nice cameras, lenses, custom sets, models, and crew gives you complete control to create that brand story.

Marketers lust after how Liquid Death does crazy marketing stunts and takes risks.But then they do boring basic stuff in their own jobs.TAKE RISKS or your brand won't stand out.— Matthew Gattozzi 📷 Photos and Videos for Brands (@MatthewGattozzi)
6:57 PM • Oct 13, 2022

Liquid Death has created a moat with their brand story.

Take raising money and valuations aside, Liquid Death has struck a cord in the consumer.

Period.

You can't argue with that.

You don't need to copy the brand story of Liquid Death, but if you aren't creating a unique storyline and unique photos and videos around your brand, you won't stand out in the noise.

Everyone can shoot on an iPhone, but few can do storytelling well with nice cameras.

Mixing the craft of photography and videography with the marketing tactics of DTC, you can create magic that will help you stand out.

In the pursuit of getting conversions, brands are losing the art of building a brand story through visuals.

If you don't want to stand out, feel free to stop reading the newsletter.

But if you do want to stand out, then keep reading on how you can get your next production ready!

2. How to be prepared for production

I believe you should budget for a high-end production every quarter to six months, depending on the size of your brand and publishing output.

Before you find a creative partner, you, as the brand, need to think about production.

Here is a list of questions you should ask before you go and find a creative partner:

What is missing in the content today that you want to see in the new content?Is this production connected to a launch of a new product or collection?Where do you see this content being used?What examples of photos or videos do you want to emulate?What is your budget range?

Internally you need to have conversations and find clarity of what you want, so that you can find the right creative partner to execute on your vision.

There are lots of logistics to figure out, but start with goals and desires for the production.

3. Find the right creative partner

I can create a video for you for $5, $500, $5000, and $50,000.

But each of those budgets creates a different outcome.

Understanding what type of content you need, how much, style, and budget range helps you nail down who might be a good partner for you.The more money you spend, the less involved you should be because you are spending on a bigger team to do more roles.

There are some incredible freelance photographers and videographers, but just know that they won't know what creative strategy is, so you will need to supplement that internally.

Understanding what you are paying for helps set expectations and what you, as a brand, need to take charge of, if at all.

Here are some questions that you should ask the creative partner:

What is your process to creating the content from start to finish?What is the schedule and timeline I should expect?What would success look like to you on this project?What is your pricing based on the deliverables I am looking for?How would you shoot this content based on the style and examples that I gave you?

Great partners will ask follow-up questions to go deeper into your needs and have an exact process and timeline.

Those that aren't as sure can be flakey and something to watch for, especially if you have a deadline or product launch.

4. How to be the best client to a creative partner

A partnership takes two to tango!

Agencies and freelancers often get criticism while brands are always seen as right.

I try to be as humble about the work and service we provide to clients, but the best work happens when the client is a great partner to us.

A great client communicates and responds promptly.

There are times when we as a team can't go any further, and we need the client to unblock us.

The lack of replying extends the timeline, which is not fair to the creative partner.

A great client doesn't micromanage.

You are hiring a creative partner for their expertise.

You are not the expert.

So don't micromanage.

Give the creatives space to create and explore.

Make sure they are on brand, align with your goals, and trust they will help you!

A great client encourages and then corrects.

Giving comments and feedback is vital to the creative process, but how you do give this feedback is important.

When you give feedback, find something you like or discuss positives.

In the past, I have received only feedback before and felt confused if they liked the work at all, which makes the editing part dreadful and confusing.

Now, don't lie if you absolutely hate the work or if it is completely off-brand, but if you like it but just have a few corrections, lead with encouragement.

Trust me, your creative partner will thank you!

5. Getting new content for 2022 and 2023

I wanted to end the newsletter by talking about getting your immediate content needs taken care of for your brand,

As you are launching a full-court attack in Q4, you might need more content for your ads, emails, social media, and website.

Now would be the time to get started to have that content in time.

Even though Q4 is very busy, it doesn't hurt to think about your goals for next year.

Q1 of 2023 will be a great time to build your content library and get a refresh of images and videos.

Having conversations today with creative partners will help you line up the right productions to start 2023 strong.


How to get high-end photos and videos that work

UGC and TikTok have completely taken over the conversation regarding producing content.

But in the shadows is high-end production of photos and videos.

I was just interviewed by Eric Bandholz about high-end photos and videos, and I wanted to go deeper here on the newsletter.

I am not saying people trash on photos and videos, but I think the conversation has shifted to "ugly" content is better than "pretty."

The issue was never what the ad or content was shot on, phone vs. cinema camera.

The issue has/is that high-end production doesn't understand conversion and e-commerce marketing.

But if you have a creative team that understands e-commerce marketing and production, that is a match made in heaven (cough cough, Goodo Studios).

Today, I will talk about what to expect to get great production created for you.

1. Why invest in nice photos and videos

The phone has democratized creation, but that doesn't mean that everyone is good at creating.

Creating photos and videos is still an art form.

A phone camera is great for quick shots, and the quality is great for that.

But if you are trying to build a brand story and a unique visual brand, which you should all want to do if you want to stand out, then you need maximum control.

Having nice cameras, lenses, custom sets, models, and crew gives you complete control to create that brand story.

Marketers lust after how Liquid Death does crazy marketing stunts and takes risks.But then they do boring basic stuff in their own jobs.TAKE RISKS or your brand won't stand out.— Matthew Gattozzi 📷 Photos and Videos for Brands (@MatthewGattozzi)
6:57 PM • Oct 13, 2022

Liquid Death has created a moat with their brand story.

Take raising money and valuations aside, Liquid Death has struck a cord in the consumer.

Period.

You can't argue with that.

You don't need to copy the brand story of Liquid Death, but if you aren't creating a unique storyline and unique photos and videos around your brand, you won't stand out in the noise.

Everyone can shoot on an iPhone, but few can do storytelling well with nice cameras.

Mixing the craft of photography and videography with the marketing tactics of DTC, you can create magic that will help you stand out.

In the pursuit of getting conversions, brands are losing the art of building a brand story through visuals.

If you don't want to stand out, feel free to stop reading the newsletter.

But if you do want to stand out, then keep reading on how you can get your next production ready!

2. How to be prepared for production

I believe you should budget for a high-end production every quarter to six months, depending on the size of your brand and publishing output.

Before you find a creative partner, you, as the brand, need to think about production.

Here is a list of questions you should ask before you go and find a creative partner:

What is missing in the content today that you want to see in the new content?Is this production connected to a launch of a new product or collection?Where do you see this content being used?What examples of photos or videos do you want to emulate?What is your budget range?

Internally you need to have conversations and find clarity of what you want, so that you can find the right creative partner to execute on your vision.

There are lots of logistics to figure out, but start with goals and desires for the production.

3. Find the right creative partner

I can create a video for you for $5, $500, $5000, and $50,000.

But each of those budgets creates a different outcome.

Understanding what type of content you need, how much, style, and budget range helps you nail down who might be a good partner for you.The more money you spend, the less involved you should be because you are spending on a bigger team to do more roles.

There are some incredible freelance photographers and videographers, but just know that they won't know what creative strategy is, so you will need to supplement that internally.

Understanding what you are paying for helps set expectations and what you, as a brand, need to take charge of, if at all.

Here are some questions that you should ask the creative partner:

What is your process to creating the content from start to finish?What is the schedule and timeline I should expect?What would success look like to you on this project?What is your pricing based on the deliverables I am looking for?How would you shoot this content based on the style and examples that I gave you?

Great partners will ask follow-up questions to go deeper into your needs and have an exact process and timeline.

Those that aren't as sure can be flakey and something to watch for, especially if you have a deadline or product launch.

4. How to be the best client to a creative partner

A partnership takes two to tango!

Agencies and freelancers often get criticism while brands are always seen as right.

I try to be as humble about the work and service we provide to clients, but the best work happens when the client is a great partner to us.

A great client communicates and responds promptly.

There are times when we as a team can't go any further, and we need the client to unblock us.

The lack of replying extends the timeline, which is not fair to the creative partner.

A great client doesn't micromanage.

You are hiring a creative partner for their expertise.

You are not the expert.

So don't micromanage.

Give the creatives space to create and explore.

Make sure they are on brand, align with your goals, and trust they will help you!

A great client encourages and then corrects.

Giving comments and feedback is vital to the creative process, but how you do give this feedback is important.

When you give feedback, find something you like or discuss positives.

In the past, I have received only feedback before and felt confused if they liked the work at all, which makes the editing part dreadful and confusing.

Now, don't lie if you absolutely hate the work or if it is completely off-brand, but if you like it but just have a few corrections, lead with encouragement.

Trust me, your creative partner will thank you!

5. Getting new content for 2022 and 2023

I wanted to end the newsletter by talking about getting your immediate content needs taken care of for your brand,

As you are launching a full-court attack in Q4, you might need more content for your ads, emails, social media, and website.

Now would be the time to get started to have that content in time.

Even though Q4 is very busy, it doesn't hurt to think about your goals for next year.

Q1 of 2023 will be a great time to build your content library and get a refresh of images and videos.

Having conversations today with creative partners will help you line up the right productions to start 2023 strong.


How to get high-end photos and videos that work

UGC and TikTok have completely taken over the conversation regarding producing content.

But in the shadows is high-end production of photos and videos.

I was just interviewed by Eric Bandholz about high-end photos and videos, and I wanted to go deeper here on the newsletter.

I am not saying people trash on photos and videos, but I think the conversation has shifted to "ugly" content is better than "pretty."

The issue was never what the ad or content was shot on, phone vs. cinema camera.

The issue has/is that high-end production doesn't understand conversion and e-commerce marketing.

But if you have a creative team that understands e-commerce marketing and production, that is a match made in heaven (cough cough, Goodo Studios).

Today, I will talk about what to expect to get great production created for you.

1. Why invest in nice photos and videos

The phone has democratized creation, but that doesn't mean that everyone is good at creating.

Creating photos and videos is still an art form.

A phone camera is great for quick shots, and the quality is great for that.

But if you are trying to build a brand story and a unique visual brand, which you should all want to do if you want to stand out, then you need maximum control.

Having nice cameras, lenses, custom sets, models, and crew gives you complete control to create that brand story.

Marketers lust after how Liquid Death does crazy marketing stunts and takes risks.But then they do boring basic stuff in their own jobs.TAKE RISKS or your brand won't stand out.— Matthew Gattozzi 📷 Photos and Videos for Brands (@MatthewGattozzi)
6:57 PM • Oct 13, 2022

Liquid Death has created a moat with their brand story.

Take raising money and valuations aside, Liquid Death has struck a cord in the consumer.

Period.

You can't argue with that.

You don't need to copy the brand story of Liquid Death, but if you aren't creating a unique storyline and unique photos and videos around your brand, you won't stand out in the noise.

Everyone can shoot on an iPhone, but few can do storytelling well with nice cameras.

Mixing the craft of photography and videography with the marketing tactics of DTC, you can create magic that will help you stand out.

In the pursuit of getting conversions, brands are losing the art of building a brand story through visuals.

If you don't want to stand out, feel free to stop reading the newsletter.

But if you do want to stand out, then keep reading on how you can get your next production ready!

2. How to be prepared for production

I believe you should budget for a high-end production every quarter to six months, depending on the size of your brand and publishing output.

Before you find a creative partner, you, as the brand, need to think about production.

Here is a list of questions you should ask before you go and find a creative partner:

What is missing in the content today that you want to see in the new content?Is this production connected to a launch of a new product or collection?Where do you see this content being used?What examples of photos or videos do you want to emulate?What is your budget range?

Internally you need to have conversations and find clarity of what you want, so that you can find the right creative partner to execute on your vision.

There are lots of logistics to figure out, but start with goals and desires for the production.

3. Find the right creative partner

I can create a video for you for $5, $500, $5000, and $50,000.

But each of those budgets creates a different outcome.

Understanding what type of content you need, how much, style, and budget range helps you nail down who might be a good partner for you.The more money you spend, the less involved you should be because you are spending on a bigger team to do more roles.

There are some incredible freelance photographers and videographers, but just know that they won't know what creative strategy is, so you will need to supplement that internally.

Understanding what you are paying for helps set expectations and what you, as a brand, need to take charge of, if at all.

Here are some questions that you should ask the creative partner:

What is your process to creating the content from start to finish?What is the schedule and timeline I should expect?What would success look like to you on this project?What is your pricing based on the deliverables I am looking for?How would you shoot this content based on the style and examples that I gave you?

Great partners will ask follow-up questions to go deeper into your needs and have an exact process and timeline.

Those that aren't as sure can be flakey and something to watch for, especially if you have a deadline or product launch.

4. How to be the best client to a creative partner

A partnership takes two to tango!

Agencies and freelancers often get criticism while brands are always seen as right.

I try to be as humble about the work and service we provide to clients, but the best work happens when the client is a great partner to us.

A great client communicates and responds promptly.

There are times when we as a team can't go any further, and we need the client to unblock us.

The lack of replying extends the timeline, which is not fair to the creative partner.

A great client doesn't micromanage.

You are hiring a creative partner for their expertise.

You are not the expert.

So don't micromanage.

Give the creatives space to create and explore.

Make sure they are on brand, align with your goals, and trust they will help you!

A great client encourages and then corrects.

Giving comments and feedback is vital to the creative process, but how you do give this feedback is important.

When you give feedback, find something you like or discuss positives.

In the past, I have received only feedback before and felt confused if they liked the work at all, which makes the editing part dreadful and confusing.

Now, don't lie if you absolutely hate the work or if it is completely off-brand, but if you like it but just have a few corrections, lead with encouragement.

Trust me, your creative partner will thank you!

5. Getting new content for 2022 and 2023

I wanted to end the newsletter by talking about getting your immediate content needs taken care of for your brand,

As you are launching a full-court attack in Q4, you might need more content for your ads, emails, social media, and website.

Now would be the time to get started to have that content in time.

Even though Q4 is very busy, it doesn't hurt to think about your goals for next year.

Q1 of 2023 will be a great time to build your content library and get a refresh of images and videos.

Having conversations today with creative partners will help you line up the right productions to start 2023 strong.